530 Shoshone Street W, Twin Falls, ID 83301
Serving the Community One Heart at a Time

National Volunteer Appreciation Month

National Volunteer Appreciation

Volunteers are a tremendous resource for charitable nonprofits. Many charitable nonprofits would not be able to conduct programs, raise funds, or serve clients without volunteers, including the Twin Falls Senior Center.

National Volunteer Appreciation Month (April) reminds us of the importance of community, and why it’s become even clearer that volunteers really are the back-bone of nonprofit organizations.

WHY VOLUNTEER?

Volunteering offers vital help to people in need, worthwhile causes, and the community, but the benefits can be even greater for you, the volunteer. Volunteering and helping others can reduce stress, combat depression, keep you mentally stimulated, and provide a sense of purpose. While it’s true that the more you volunteer, the more benefits you’ll experience, volunteering doesn’t have to involve a long-term commitment or take a huge amount of time out of your busy day. Simple ways of giving can help those in need while improving your health and happiness.

  1. Volunteering connects you to others
  2. Volunteering is good for your mind and body
  3. Volunteering can advance your career
  4. Volunteering brings fun & fulfillment to your life

One of the more well-known benefits of Volunteering is the impact on the community. Volunteering allows you to connect to your community and
make it a better place. Even helping out with the smallest tasks can make a real difference to the lives of people, animals, and organizations in need.
And volunteering is a two-way street: It can benefit you and your family as much as the cause you choose to help. Dedicating your time as a volunteer
helps you make new friends, expand your network, and boost your social skills.

Volunteering helps counteract the effects of stress, anger, and anxiety. The social contact aspect of helping and working with others can have a profound effect on your overall psychological well-being. Nothing relieves stress better than a meaningful connection to another person.

Volunteering combats depression. Volunteering keeps you in regular contact with others and helps you develop a solid support system, which in turn protects you against depression.

Volunteering makes you happy. By measuring hormones and brain activity, researchers have discovered that being helpful to others delivers immense
pleasure. Human beings are hard-wired to give to others. The more we give, the happier we feel.

Volunteering increases self-confidence. You are doing good for others and the community, which provides a natural sense of accomplishment. Your role as a volunteer can also give you a sense of pride and identity. And the better you feel about yourself, the more likely you are to have a positive
view of your life and future goals.

Volunteering provides a sense of purpose. Older adults, especially those who have retired or lost a spouse, can find new meaning and direction in their lives by helping others. Whatever your age or life situation, volunteering can help take your mind off your own worries, keep you mentally stimulated, and add more zest to your life.

Volunteering helps you stay physically healthy. Studies have found that those who volunteer have a lower mortality rate than those who do not. Older volunteers tend to walk more, find it easier to cope with everyday tasks, are less likely to develop high blood pressure, and have better thinking skills. Volunteering can also lessen symptoms of chronic pain and reduce the risk of heart disease.

Volunteering is a fun and easy way to explore your interests and passions. Doing volunteer work you find meaningful and interesting can be a relaxing, energizing escape from your day-to-day routine of work, school, or family commitments. Volunteering also provides you with renewed creativity, motivation, and vision that can carry over into your personal and professional life.

Volunteering doesn’t have to take over your life to be beneficial. In fact, research shows that just two to three hours per week, or about 100 hours a year, can confer the most benefits—to both you and your chosen cause. The important thing is to volunteer only the amount of time that feels comfortable to you. Volunteering should feel like a fun and rewarding
hobby, not another chore on your to-do list.



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